In a world trying to rebound from the wildly fluctuating Covid 19 / lockdown recession, leaders of organisations will need to confront managing in this “new normal” era. For many years it has been possible (although not always achievable) to be successful simply by relying on market growth. For most companies, those days are now over.

Reaction

Responding to the crisis, organisations have had to make rapid-fire decisions with team members in different locations/departments. In order to achieve their original objectives, they have had to act, react and shift operational strategies, with no time for long, drawn-out strategy sessions. That’s a lesson that will last. The entire workforce, from leaders to frontline workers, is gaining a new sense of confidence in risk-taking.

Radical and dramatic organisational renewal and redesign have become essential as a result of changes in our use of technology, consumer and employee behaviour, competitive threats, and other things that threaten the life of our organisations.

With the prospect of low or even negative growth and even more intense competition, for many years to come, much will rest on how organisational leaders and their executive teams are to challenge their traditional ways and managerial wisdoms while moving away from their comfort zones. Not only will they need to question, re-assess, redefine their managerial thinking and basic beliefs but they will have to re-examine the context in which they make decisions.

Challenge

Long-standing pre-conceptions about business models will have to be thrown overboard and will need to be replaced by flexible quick-response mindsets, capable of responding to the challenges of rapidly transforming markets. Managers will need to rethink their entire approach to business, from research and development and product design to manufacturing, sales, marketing and even government relations, as government becomes more involved in purchasing and economic decision-making. They will have to become more aware of changing customer and employee behaviours and attitudes.

They will also have to accept that virtually everything they do will be done in a ”fish bowl,” as heightened governance standards become the norm. And they will have to rethink such business fundamentals as shareholder value and replace this with stakeholder value. The focus is typically on how leadership manages change, and the impact of management’s philosophy on the organisation and its employees. The focus on leadership is essential in terms of employee participation, use of resources, availability of external support, and the determination of the extent to which organisational renewal may add value to the inherent strength in the organisation.

Given the dynamics of today’s business climate, it is not surprising that change management is a topic that emerges constantly as we interact with executives and executive leadership teams and will not be solved overnight. But, as with all complex change, we know progress can be made in the near term and it is essential that we begin now.

The biggest challenge for organisational leaders is to understand what happens in organisational renewal when employee participation becomes necessary. Introducing and managing successful renewal requires that leaders not only convince their employees to embrace change but also engage employees in the decision making, holding people responsible for the renewal, thereby strengthening their commitment to the changes.

As business leaders navigate this new way of working, an internal communication tool can provide them with the features needed to put their minds at ease and stay connected with their teams, in lieu of face-to-face contact, to sustain an engaged workforce

Stratview Measurement System

Long-standing pre-conceptions about business models will have to be thrown overboard and will need to be replaced by flexible quick-response mindsets, capable of responding to the challenges of rapidly transforming markets. Managers will need to rethink their entire approach to business, from research and development and product design to manufacturing, sales, marketing and even government relations, as government becomes more involved in purchasing and economic decision-making. They will have to become more aware of changing customer and employee behaviours and attitudes.

They will also have to accept that virtually everything they do will be done in a ”fish bowl,” as heightened governance standards become the norm. And they will have to rethink such business fundamentals as shareholder value and replace this with stakeholder value. The focus is typically on how leadership manages change, and the impact of management’s philosophy on the organisation and its employees. The focus on leadership is essential in terms of employee participation, use of resources, availability of external support, and the determination of the extent to which organisational renewal may add value to the inherent strength in the organisation.

Given the dynamics of today’s business climate, it is not surprising that change management is a topic that emerges constantly as we interact with executives and executive leadership teams and will not be solved overnight. But, as with all complex change, we know progress can be made in the near term and it is essential that we begin now.

The biggest challenge for organisational leaders is to understand what happens in organisational renewal when employee participation becomes necessary. Introducing and managing successful renewal requires that leaders not only convince their employees to embrace change but also engage employees in the decision making, holding people responsible for the renewal, thereby strengthening their commitment to the changes.

As business leaders navigate this new way of working, an internal communication tool can provide them with the features needed to put their minds at ease and stay connected with their teams, in lieu of face-to-face contact, to sustain an engaged workforce

Conclusion

Senior managers seeking to lead through these times will require skills both like and unlike what they have already developed. They need to think even more strategically about the future, communicate more persuasively, and act more decisively, all while strengthening the leadership of those around them.